Started a sidecar project yesterday.

Offline

Scott-E

Vetter Aficionado
Joined
Jan 27, 2016
Messages
252
Likes
108
Points
43
Age
62
Location
Weaver, AL
#1
Picked up a 1982 Honda Rebel 250 that was missing it's engine an a few other parts I don't need. Paid $75 for it. I wanted one of the wheels, rear shocks, and swing arm to use for the wheel and suspension on the sidecar frame. I have all that stuff stripped off the frame so I could check those parts for worn or damaged parts. Surprisingly all that stuff looks like new. I don't think this bike diden't have any miles put on it before it's engine was removed. The brake pads don't show any wear. I think it was purchased and sat unused until the piston rings rusted and stuck tight to the cylinder walls. The odometer shows just 1.5 miles. After removing the wheels and swing arm I believe that mileage is correct. There was no chain lube that had been slung off the chain and collect on the chain guard.
I think I'm going to fit the front wheel and drum brake on the sidecar. I can modify the front drum brake as it's exactly like the rear except it's setup for cable pull and not a rod and I'll need to fab a bracket for the brake to attach the brake arm to it. It had a slot that matched a tang on the fork to keep it from rotating. That will make connecting it to a brake lever beside the rear brake lever on the bike easier.
 
Offline

Scott-E

Vetter Aficionado
Joined
Jan 27, 2016
Messages
252
Likes
108
Points
43
Age
62
Location
Weaver, AL
#4
Maybe you can find a brake pedal from a right-hand shifted bike to mount beside the bike's brake pedal.
I can fabricate a brake pedal and mount it on the sidecar frame so it's close beside the bikes brake pedal. I'll set it up so I can press both at the same time. Right now I'm designing a small frame that will attach to my bike where the sidecar lower frame mounts will attach. It can stay on the bike when I need to remove the sidecar. Just put the kick stand down, pull the upper strut mounts off the bike and let it lean over, attach two "landing gear wheels" to the sidecar frame, and then pull the lower pins and roll the sidecar out of the way. Another plus for using a swing arm from a chain drive bike is the Tow-in can be set at the wheel instead of adjusting the sidecar frame to bike mount. It will be super easy to just pull the Hack into a parking lot and fine adjust Tow-in as needed.
 
Offline

Scott-E

Vetter Aficionado
Joined
Jan 27, 2016
Messages
252
Likes
108
Points
43
Age
62
Location
Weaver, AL
#7
I fabricated an adapter for connecting the Bike frame to the sidecar frame. It's made of 2" X 4" X 1/4" heavy angle iron. I am using 6, 3/8" X 1.25" U-clamps to attach the adapter to the motorcycles frame. Two of the clamps are attached to the frame tubing where it starts curving upward so I never need worry about it twisting on the frame tubing under load. I had to slot the clamp holes where the U-clamps pass through so it would go on and come off easy. I attempted to get it on with just round drilled holes, which proved impossible to do. The U-clamps have very little clearance between the engine and frame tubing. The slotted holes allow a little leeway as you put the frame adapter and U-clamps on and off. I still need to make and attach two clevis's that will connect to the sidecar frame . I'll do that after fabricating the sidecar frame.
 

Attachments

Offline

Dave Ireland

Vetter Aficionado
Joined
Oct 14, 2015
Messages
178
Likes
38
Points
28
Location
Ireland
#8
I like that method. I've been toying with the sidecar idea for a while, and my opinion is gradually moving away from them being the work of the Devil, to recognising that if I want to keep riding all year round as I get older, the sidecar presents an option that is relatively easy to build and insure. So, I've been looking around at various methods for inspiration - nothing praises an idea more than stealing it, as they say.