Vetter Crash Bars

#1
Does anybody know if these will work on a GL1000 with Lowers? Mine has a WJ SS on it. It would be nice to have highway pegs on my new GL and keep the lowers.

Vetter-GL1000-Crash-Bars.jpg
 
#2
1. Do not expect "crash bars/engine protectors" to protect your engine in a crash. I call them 'oops' bars. Great for when you drop your bike in the parking lot, but......


2. Lowers can be (and often are) trimmed to clear crash bars.


3. Crash bars that attach at the rear upper motor mount/hanger (which the ones in your pic appear to do) can interfere with your legs. I call them shin splitters and won't use them.

4. There were literally dozens of different crash bars for the GL1000. Few are still available in the condition in your pic (NOS?)
 

brianinpa

Five Star Vetteral
#3
I had a set similar to those and quickly swapped them out for a set for a 1983 GoldWing. I am not sure if they would fit the 1000 frame though. I wanted the 1983 bars because of the upright piece that the 80 through 82 did not.

I think the most desirable for the 1000 are similar to these, but they are made from un-obtainium...

 
#5
Looking at the bars in the opening post, and presuming (uh-oh) that I'm looking at them correctly, it appears the end with the clamps wraps around the front of the head, and not over it like the one in the pic with the exposed timing pulley.
 

rob.lafady

Vetter Aficionado
#6
I'll have to check later today, but they look a lot like the ones I use on mine and my lowers clear them with no trimming.

Sent from my HTC One M9 using Tapatalk
 

Scott-E

Vetter Aficionado
#7
1. Do not expect "crash bars/engine protectors" to protect your engine in a crash. I call them 'oops' bars. Great for when you drop your bike in the parking lot, but......
And all this time I thought those bars were just for mounting extra lights, fairing lowers, and foot pegs;).
 

Dave Ireland

Vetter Aficionado
#9
The problem with motors that have the cylinders on top of the motor... they don't last as long.:p
Approaching 300K on a GS850 would say different :)
My general approach to crashbars is - I'll always fit them if I can get them (bearing in mind the 'shin-splitter' design to be avoided, of course), as I've seen too many wrecked engines that would have been rideable if bars had been fitted.
It's never much fun waiting to be uplifted from the side of the road by the recovery truck; I'd rather be riding. Apart from that, engine repairs are expensive.
 
#10
...My general approach to crashbars is - I'll always fit them if I can get them (bearing in mind the 'shin-splitter' design to be avoided, of course), as I've seen too many wrecked engines that would have been rideable if bars had been fitted.
It's never much fun waiting to be uplifted from the side of the road by the recovery truck; I'd rather be riding. Apart from that, engine repairs are expensive.
I consider the term "crash" bar as misleading. Great for when you leave your kickstand up in the parking lot, but in an actual crash, YRMV!:(
 

Dave Ireland

Vetter Aficionado
#11
Depends on the bar - how well it's designed. The one in your pic was bad, for sure, leaving too much exposed. A tri-point cage normally works better, but leverage when the bike is sliding down the tarmac can bend anything back.
On my 'zuks I have tri-point and bent-handle types, and both have withstood a crash or two, but they're very close into the cases and quite stout.
 
#12
Well if I understand you, that was a 'tri-point' attached to motor mounts front, rear, and below the engine. Pic is post-crash and looks pulled away from the engine (which it is.) Originally it hugged the engine more closely. Probably would have worked fine sliding down the tarmac. The car I hit had different ideas though.

I don't blame the 'crash bar' for the damage as I hit hard enough to bent the frame and forks (front wheel into radiator.) They actually probably greatly reduced the engine damage (~ $100.00.) New frame and forks were the big ticket items and no crash bar could have prevented that.

Bike was one month old with 947 miles. Repair estimate was $2685 new cost was $2995. Took about $700 of new parts to make it roadworthy (replacement of cosmetic damaged parts was not done, depending on severity and/or visibility.)

I have and use 'crash bars' but have no preconceptions of the engine coming out of a 'REAL' crash unscathed.
 

Dave Ireland

Vetter Aficionado
#13
Yeah, a real crash is going to result in a properly unrideable bike, no matter what's fitted where.
On balance though, a decent set of c'bars will prove their worth over and over again for the majority of mishaps that would have resulted in a holed casing bad enough to stop the trip dead in its tracks.
I've been convinced of their worth since the early days of Japanese fours when I saw how vulnerable the end casings were, and heard / read many tales of v. expensive damage caused by minor tumbles. The clincher was when a friend of mine slid down the road on his fairly new CB750 (one of the first in the country) and the damn bike was nearly a write-off because of the damage suffered.
Yet, to this day, some people won't fit them 'because they don't look cool'.
Hah.
 
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