Windjammer orange wire to fuse box

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SteveGL1200

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#1
Greetings all and love the site. Spent the winter rebuilding a 1984 Honda GL1200 with Windjammer. Took everything apart - now all together but for an orange wire coming from the Jammer fairing harness. I remember, sort of, it connects to either the positive or negative terminal in the fuse box under the 'tank'. I have no turn signals so I'm assuming it connects those but don't want to fry something with wrong connection. Any help appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 
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#2
In the fairing, the orange wire is for "horn switch or accessory." I'd look inside the fairing and see if it is hooked up to anything.
 
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As in any wiring, what any given wire should be connected to depends on what the other end of that wire connects to. Colors are how we tell them apart, but we mustn't presume where the 'other end' actually terminates.

That said, the orange wire is typically used as a switched hot, meaning it's only energized when the bike's key is on. If you have no electrical accessories in the fairing, you don't even need to connect it at all.

According to this wiring diagram, there is a pair of terminals near the 10-amp accessory fuse for accessories and ground:

See: http://goldwingdocs.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=19&t=20438

Also see: http://kz900.com/kz/vetter/vetter77-wiring.jpg


To add: When I installed my W5 on my '96 Nighthawk, I separated the left and right front running lights, so they could turn off individually (for maximum contrast) when the turn signals are used, just like the originals.
 
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I used that wire for my satellite radio and audio amplifier. At the battery positive post I connected a fuse holder and then a switch to kill power to the radio and amplifier. I don't like having power running to radio's and amplifiers when I use the engine starter. It's located right next to the bikes keyed switch so it's easy to switch it on and off while riding. After the switch it connects to the red wire on the fairing pig tail. Inside the fairing that wire is connected to the tiny power adaptor for the radio and the 12 volt power plug on the audio amplifier. If I need to talk to someone or use a CB or HAM radio I can just turn all that stuff off instead if trying to mute the satellite radio and the amplifier would still be powered and cause all sorts of problems when transmitting with the Ham radio. 2 meters causes the audio amplifier to squeal like a stuck pig if it's on and the satellite radio is off.
 
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SteveGL1200

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In the fairing, the orange wire is for "horn switch or accessory." I'd look inside the fairing and see if it is hooked up to anything.
Greetings Ron and thanks for the info. I ended up not attaching the orange wire and my GL1200 runs great...until it dies. Appears to be running on the battery. Need to figure out how to check the alternator. Thanks again.
 
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SteveGL1200

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#7
As in any wiring, what any given wire should be connected to depends on what the other end of that wire connects to. Colors are how we tell them apart, but we mustn't presume where the 'other end' actually terminates.

That said, the orange wire is typically used as a switched hot, meaning it's only energized when the bike's key is on. If you have no electrical accessories in the fairing, you don't even need to connect it at all.

According to this wiring diagram, there is a pair of terminals near the 10-amp accessory fuse for accessories and ground:

See: http://goldwingdocs.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=19&t=20438

Also see: http://kz900.com/kz/vetter/vetter77-wiring.jpg


To add: When I installed my W5 on my '96 Nighthawk, I separated the left and right front running lights, so they could turn off individually (for maximum contrast) when the turn signals are used, just like the originals.
Greetings Larry. Great advice and links. Really appreciate it. Now I need to figure out why my GL1200 is running on the battery...and dying on my only two rides.
 
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#9
If you're not electricity-savvy, this might be a situation where a dealer/shop's diagnostic fee is money better spent than replacing parts without knowing whether that is the resolution.
 
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Scott-E

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Greetings Ron and thanks for the info. I ended up not attaching the orange wire and my GL1200 runs great...until it dies. Appears to be running on the battery. Need to figure out how to check the alternator. Thanks again.
GL1200's are notorious for burning out stators at around 50,000 miles. The cause is a combination of poor wiring and the plastic connector between the stator and regulator. That connector heats up due to poor connections across the connector. That connector made assembly easy at the factory but it's the main reason stators burn up on GL1100 and GL1200 Goldwings. The first thing to do is to check and see if it's charging on your bike. I won't go into the process here as there are many internet sites that show how to do it. Here's a link to a well done one.
http://www.goldwingfacts.com/goldwingstatortest.htm

If it fails the test and you have a bad stator you have a major problem. If you can strip the bike to it's frame, pull the engine so you can replace the stator, and reassemble the bike yourself you can probably salvage the bike. If you've got to pay a shop to do it for you the cost of that is going to exceed the value of the bike. A few years ago people were attaching a small automotive alternator to the engine and just cutting the stator wires off and eliminating it from the system. Even Honda switched to an easy to replace alternator on later Goldwings. Sadly all the people that made parts and brackets to attach an automotive alternator to GL1100 and GL1200 have quit simply because the market for that dried up because all those bikes are so old now. You can google "Poorboy alternator conversion" which will bring up links that described how it was done. If you can fabricate brackets and weld you can do the conversion yourself but again if you must pay someone to do it for you you're back to exceeding the value of the bike to fix it. Here is a picture of an alternator conversion.

Here's an advertisement for the kit.
 
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SteveGL1200

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GL1200's are notorious for burning out stators at around 50,000 miles. The cause is a combination of poor wiring and the plastic connector between the stator and regulator. That connector heats up due to poor connections across the connector. That connector made assembly easy at the factory but it's the main reason stators burn up on GL1100 and GL1200 Goldwings. The first thing to do is to check and see if it's charging on your bike. I won't go into the process here as there are many internet sites that show how to do it. Here's a link to a well done one.
http://www.goldwingfacts.com/goldwingstatortest.htm

If it fails the test and you have a bad stator you have a major problem. If you can strip the bike to it's frame, pull the engine so you can replace the stator, and reassemble the bike yourself you can probably salvage the bike. If you've got to pay a shop to do it for you the cost of that is going to exceed the value of the bike. A few years ago people were attaching a small automotive alternator to the engine and just cutting the stator wires off and eliminating it from the system. Even Honda switched to an easy to replace alternator on later Goldwings. Sadly all the people that made parts and brackets to attach an automotive alternator to GL1100 and GL1200 have quit simply because the market for that dried up because all those bikes are so old now. You can google "Poorboy alternator conversion" which will bring up links that described how it was done. If you can fabricate brackets and weld you can do the conversion yourself but again if you must pay someone to do it for you you're back to exceeding the value of the bike to fix it. Here is a picture of an alternator conversion.

Here's an advertisement for the kit.
Fantastic Scott. Thanks for the info and links. Will test the stator today. Appreciate it mucho.
 
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SteveGL1200

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#12
If you're not electricity-savvy, this might be a situation where a dealer/shop's diagnostic fee is money better spent than replacing parts without knowing whether that is the resolution.
Thanks Larry and I agree. Will do more testing today. Funny how love trumps cost. And I love this bike. Appreciate it mucho.
 
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Greeting Brian and thanks for the reply. All lights work now OK. Big issue is running on the battery. Guess it's the alternator. Arrrrggg!
My stator was toast when I bought my 1200. It's an 84 Standard and at the time it only had 7100 miles on it. For that rwason, I changed the stator rather than do the poorboy conversion. Is yours a Standard?
 
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SteveGL1200

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My stator was toast when I bought my 1200. It's an 84 Standard and at the time it only had 7100 miles on it. For that rwason, I changed the stator rather than do the poorboy conversion. Is yours a Standard?
Thanks Brian. My GL1200 is a Standard. Just did the stator test and got very low readings and a zero on one wire. Bummer because the bike rocks...while running on the battery for 50 miles. Calling Ed's MC in Spokane tomorrow. In over my head to pull the engine.
 
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Thanks Brian. My GL1200 is a Standard. Just did the stator test and got very low readings and a zero on one wire. Bummer because the bike rocks...while running on the battery for 50 miles. Calling Ed's MC in Spokane tomorrow. In over my head to pull the engine.
You would be surprised just how easy it is... I think the hardest part is keeping everything organized and labeled so that reassembly goes smoothly. When I was looking at it the first time, I was quoted 8 hours of labor plus the parts. I did the math and quickly decided that for about $300 in parts I could spend the 8 hours and do it myself.

There are several GoldWing forums where the members would help you with any problems:
http://classicgoldwings.com/forum/portal.php?sid=f47fb8805ce46be30075222d45469ef1
http://www.ngwclub.com/forum/index.php?sid=09238c75b8908bfa6a42e31104c7deba
 
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SteveGL1200

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You would be surprised just how easy it is... I think the hardest part is keeping everything organized and labeled so that reassembly goes smoothly. When I was looking at it the first time, I was quoted 8 hours of labor plus the parts. I did the math and quickly decided that for about $300 in parts I could spend the 8 hours and do it myself.

There are several GoldWing forums where the members would help you with any problems:
http://classicgoldwings.com/forum/portal.php?sid=f47fb8805ce46be30075222d45469ef1
http://www.ngwclub.com/forum/index.php?sid=09238c75b8908bfa6a42e31104c7deba
Thanks again Brian. I stripped my GL to the frame and motor this winter and went thur almost everything. Bike was not taken care of and from Oregon, so it had what I call 'Oregon Cancer'....then I discovered buffing. For all I know the stator may have been bad when I bought the bike. I'm bummed right now so I'm taking some time to meditate on dropping the engine. I could probably do it, but want to check on the cost at the MC shop. Would rather ride than wrench. Thanks for the follow-up. Rubber down.
 
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You would be surprised just how easy it is...
I can agree. Years ago, the camshaft of my SOHC Honda 750 broke near the middle, but I made it home on two cylinders. I bought a basket of engine parts from my local Honda dealer, and replaced the necessary parts.

I removed the engine, replaced the parts, and reinstalled the engine all in one weekend. It can be done.
 
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Thanks again Brian. I stripped my GL to the frame and motor this winter and went thur almost everything. Bike was not taken care of and from Oregon, so it had what I call 'Oregon Cancer'....then I discovered buffing. For all I know the stator may have been bad when I bought the bike. I'm bummed right now so I'm taking some time to meditate on dropping the engine. I could probably do it, but want to check on the cost at the MC shop. Would rather ride than wrench. Thanks for the follow-up. Rubber down.
Every GL1200 I've ever looked at that was for sale had a bad stator. That's the reason they were attempting to sell it. There is one guy running around on his GL1200 with a bad stator that figured out how to live with it as is. He put a deep cycle battery in a saddle bag and installed LED lights. He even came up with an LED H4 bulb for the headlight. He recharges the deep cycle battery with an automatic charger whenever it's in the garage, which is every night. He's been doing that for years. I guess it works for him as he never goes on any long rides.
 
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#19
After the stator, don't forget the voltage regulator / rectifier. The rectifier (diode) could throw you a curve as well, an alternator is just that, puts out voltage and draws it back so the battery does not charge. The rectifier is like a one way check valve for voltage current and converts AC to DC.