windshields?

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Seth Matthews

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#1
I'm curious, where are you guys finding your windshields.. I'm about due for a new one, Riding at night is hard when the glare takes over the entire windshield. I've tried buffing it out, no luck.
 
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Scott-E

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#2
I'm curious, where are you guys finding your windshields.. I'm about due for a new one, Riding at night is hard when the glare takes over the entire windshield. I've tried buffing it out, no luck.
I made mine out of Lexan. Lexan cuts very nicely using a band saw or even a jig saw and drilling holes in it is easy as well. No need to worry about heating it to bend that curve in it. It's flexible and will easily bend into the curve of that Windjammer.
 
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Seth Matthews

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#6
So, has anyone ever just trimmed their windshield down to just a bug deflector? I'm considering this to try it out before I order a new one. questions, where do I measure from, and where do you recommend cutting it down to?
 
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Scott-E

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#7
So, has anyone ever just trimmed their windshield down to just a bug deflector? I'm considering this to try it out before I order a new one. questions, where do I measure from, and where do you recommend cutting it down to?
Always measure from the centre of the windshield. As for height, it depends on the seat height of the bike in relation to the Windjammer fairing. I put a Windjammer 4 on my modern Honda Shadow Cruiser. Cruisers did not exist when Craig Vetter designed the Windjammer so typically the Windshield is 21 or 23 inches for those 70's era "Standard" bikes. That height allows the rider to just peak over the top of the windshield so vision is unobstructed if the windshield fogs up or when riding in the rain. Because modern Cruiser design feature a low seating position I'm just peaking over my 14" windshield. Even so called "Sport" windshields for the Windjammer are 16" in height. On a standard bike I think cutting one down to 16" would be about the maximum amount to cut one and still retain any sort of protection.
I've been thinking about replacing my windshield with sheet aluminium that would be even with the top of the fairing. Behind that sheet of aluminium would be a couple of tracks to hold a sheet of lexan with a motor drive that would allow me rise and lower that clear lexan so I could adjust the height simply by pressing a button.
You can see how short my windshield is in the picture below.
 
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Seth Matthews

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#8
The lexan we have locally was very flexible, to a fault. it curved very easily, but I feared that it would bend in the wind. However, at the height of the windshield in your pic, it wouldn't make a difference in the wind, because it would be more stable than if it were a higher windshield. is my logic correct?
 
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Scott-E

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#9
The lexan we have locally was very flexible, to a fault. it curved very easily, but I feared that it would bend in the wind. However, at the height of the windshield in your pic, it wouldn't make a difference in the wind, because it would be more stable than if it were a higher windshield. is my logic correct?
The entire windshield curves to fit the curve of the fairing so that curve should prevent it from folding back even if it's 21" in height. You could also cut and bend some thin plywood available at Lowes and like places. You could cut some wood strips with the same radius as the fairing and screw the plywood to them. The curve is not very much so there's no need to wet the plywood with hot water to make that slight curve in it. Then you take your (flat) lexan windshield and lay it on the curved plywood. Using a heat gun slowly warm the lexan. You'll want a sweeping motion across the lexan so you heat it evenly. As the temperature approaches 315 degrees Fahrenheit the lexan will start to go limp and lay flat on the curve of the plywood form. As soon as it takes the shape of the plywood stop heating it and allow it to cool. Don't hurry the cooling process. Simply allow it to cool on the plywood form. As soon as it acquires room temperature you can pick it up and attach it to your Windjammer.